Our Points of Light Awardees!!!

http://www.pointsoflight.org/programs/recognition/dpol/awards/5611

 

The Turocy/Pepin Family

Award Number: 
5611
  November 17, 2015

The Turocy/Pepin Family is one of 10 service-minded families being recognized by Points of Light and Disney in honor of Family Volunteer Day, Nov. 21.

If you’re fortunate enough to not have to worry about where your next meal is coming from, you may not be able to relate to the hardships associated with hunger. Malnutrition is a very serious issue plaguing many communities throughout this country. Whether it’s not having an adequate amount of food, or just a lack of healthy options, there are far too many people who suffer.

Tackling such an issue as hunger is not an individual effort, instead it takes more of a unified, collective approach. Together, The Turocy/ Pepin family is helping grow a healthy end to hunger.

turocy-pepin-lisa2c_ty_and_son.jpgThe Turocy/Pepin’s at the Katie’s Krops Four Year Anniversary.

Feeding the community truly is a family affair. Using their gardening skills, Ty Pepin, his wife, Lisa Turocy, and their son, Alexander, works closely with Katie’s Krops.

Katie’s Krops is an organization aimed at fighting hunger. Their mission is to start and maintain vegetable gardens of all sizes and donate the harvest to help feed those in need.

In 2008, for a school project, nine-year-old Katie Stagliano planted a single cabbage in her front yard; seven years later the idea has flourished into a movement. Katie’s Krops now consist of 83 gardens all across the country, all maintained by the local children of the community.

“I could not have grown Katie’s Krops without the help of the Turocy/ Pepin family,” said Katie. “They give with all their heart and have provided healthy food to thousands of people.”

Lisa, who’s been an avid gardener since 1998, has been on hand to help Katie’s Krops since the very beginning. As a Master Gardener, she uses her experience, as well as provides personal guidance, to assist the children in maintaining the gardens. Whether she is sharing tips or out there helping plant herself, Lisa’s commitment has not wavered.

turocy-pepinalexander.jpgAlexander gardening in the Katie’s Krops Flagship Garden.

“I made the commitment to a little girl who had a dream, and that was important to me,” said Lisa. “It’s incredible that my training as a Master Gardener could in turn help someone else begin to make their dream a reality.”

While Lisa’s knowledge of gardening is necessary, it is her husband’s involvement behind the scenes that keeps the gardens functioning. From building a raised bed for the crops, to building the Katie’s Krops website, Ty’s do-it-all approach goes a long way toward fighting hunger.

Attempting to cure the sickness of hunger has truly been a family effort. For proof of that, look no further then future Master Gardener, Alexander. At just 5 years old, Alexander is no stranger to the garden. Ever since he could walk, he has been assisting his parents in the field. He is also an advocate for agriculture as he engages his classmates to assist with Katie’s Krops.

“I love working with Katie in the Katie Krops garden,” said Alexander. “Katie’s Krops is awesome,” he added.

Being able to provide for those less fortunate while nurturing the future leaders of tomorrow is an opportunity that Lisa and Ty truly cherish.

“One of the greatest gifts we can give is to encourage that love of the environment and the world to our children,” said Ty.

The Turocy/ Pepin family proves that family volunteering is effective. With a collective effort anything is possible. A unified approach trumps a singular effort, and with the help of like minded individuals, there is no goal that is unattainable.

“For those who want to make a difference in their community, I would tell them that you can truly accomplish whatever you have set your sights on and that you can do anything no matter how young or old you are,” said Lisa.  “Always believe in yourself and never give up.”

Boys & Girls Club Gardening Project | Troy-Bilt

Troy-Bilt® was founded on a passion for gardening. Now we’ve partnered with Katie’s Krops to inspire the next generation of gardeners and feed people in their community. We worked with Téa and Tina at the Boys & Girls Club to help them break ground on a garden that will feed the kids and families who attend the club.

One Girl’s Mission to Fight Hunger Now Six Years Strong

NBC NEWS
At age 9, Katie Stagliano planted a garden to feed the hungry. Six years later, what began as an idea hatched in her backyard has spread nationwide.
Published October 24th 2014,

This 14-Year-Old’s Homework Assignment Sparked A Mission to Feed America’s Hungry

When she was in the third grade, Katie Stagliano received a homework assignment that changed her life: To grow a cabbage from a single seedling. Hers grew to about 40 pounds. She took the cabbage to the local soup kitchen, where it was served with ham and rice to around 275 people.

“When I looked at the people in line I thought ‘wow, they’re just like my family,’” Katie says of her experience handing out food that day. “For all I know, they could have been my family who had fallen on hard times.” Six years later, Katie’s Krops supports 75 youth-run gardens in 27 states and has raised over $200,000.

Watch Katie’s remarkable story here, and check out the feature film The Starfish Throwers where she is featured alongside two others whose individual efforts to feed the poor are igniting a movement in the fight against hunger.

 

Read more: http://nationswell.com/katie-stagliano-feeds-hungry-through-katies-krops/#ixzz3Hv5zu9my

Katie Stagliano is “Money Hero” for South Carolina

140619_HER07_39

Age: 15
Hometown: Summerville
Cause: Healthy produce for low-income families

Participating in a school gardening project in the third grade, Katie Stagliano grew a cabbage that topped out at 40 pounds. At her father’s encouragement, Stagliano donated the cabbage to a soup kitchen, where it helped feed 275 people. After realizing how many people one (very large) cabbage could feed, she decided to see how many people one garden could feed. Using a football-field-sized plot of land that her school donated, Stagliano created Katie’s Krops to get other kids interested in helping people through gardening. Six years later, that garden supplies food directly to families in need and to churches, shelters and soup kitchens around the state. But like that cabbage, Katie’s Krops has grown far bigger. Through its website, Katie’s Krops has raised almost $200,000 — individual and corporate donations enable 9-to-16-year to grow vegetables to feed the hungry in their community. Currently there are 75 youth-run gardens in 27 states. Katie’s goal now: 500 gardens in 50 states.

Says Stagliano:

I am proud to grow healthy food, prevent hunger and empower kids to grow a healthy end to hunger in their communities.”

View the source article  

What’s Your Forty-Pound Cabbage?

What’s Your Forty-Pound Cabbage?

Posted: 06/19/2013 3:53 pm

 
 
 

When Katie Stagliano was nine years old she participated in the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Growing project. Established in 2002 to inspire kids to grow vegetables, the purpose of the program is as straightforward as you’d think it ought to be. Grow cabbage. And, that’s exactly what she did; except this was no ordinary produce — Katie grew a forty pound cabbage. Most people, young or old, would probably take some pictures and maybe think “Coleslaw for everyone!” But not Katie. She saw this enormous piece of produce as both a challenge and an opportunity. In Katie’s own words:

At the age of nine, I did not have a true understanding of the complexities of the issue of hunger. What I did understand was that there were individuals and families in my community who did not have enough to eat. I have a backyard where I could and do grow fresh vegetables and donate the produce to families that are struggling with hunger — a simple solution to a problem that is not only in my community, but also globally.

And thus, Katie’s Krops was born.

Across the country young people just like Katie are seeing problems in their community and coming up with solutions to address them.

Yash Gupta’s high school career began in a most inauspicious way — his eyeglasses broke. As he stumbled through his first weeks of school without being able to see the board clearly and in general feeling more overwhelmed and disoriented than your typical freshman, one thing did become crystal clear for Yash — good vision might possibly be the most important and most overlooked component to a student’s academic success.

With a little digging, Yash learned that there are 13 million children in the world who need glasses but cannot afford them; he also found out that more than three million pairs of used eyeglasses are discarded in North America every year. So, Yash started Sight Learning to try to bridge the gap. For Yash, this isn’t merely about eyeglasses for 13 million kids; it is much, much more.

“These 13 million children are students, students who cannot make the most of their educational opportunities because of a lack of eyeglasses, which prevents them from being able to see and consequently learn,” Yash shared.

They are 13 million potential leaders, 13 million youth who can change the world in the future. Sight Learning’s work matters, not only because we are providing eye-glasses to students in developing nations, giving them better access to education and helping them for the future, but we are also inspiring youth around the world to take a stand, find a passion and make a difference.

Katie is 14 and Yash is 17. They are two of the six generationOn Hasbro Community Action Heroes selected this year — each remarkable in his or her own way. A Hasbro Community Action Hero is a young person who makes an extraordinary mark on the world through service. The winners’ achievements must demonstrate outstanding service to one’s local, national or global community, extraordinary effort in creating innovative solutions to community needs and leadership of an exceptional service or advocacy activity.

And, yes, it is true that Katie is the youngest person to ever receive the Clinton Global Citizen Award for Leadership in Civil Society, and it is also true that Yash’s organization has — thus far — raised more than $350,000 (7,000 pairs of eyeglasses and counting!) and conducted eye screenings in developing countries. They are, in a word, exceptional. What they are not, however, is “the exception” when it comes to youth service.

Both Katie and Yash embody the blessing of being young — sometimes things actually can be as straightforward as they appear, and young people really don’t like taking no for an answer. There is a lot we can learn from them. All Katie really did was grow an exceptionally large cabbage and then think to herself “there’s got to be something productive I can do with this produce.” When she donated it to a local food kitchen and learned that her one cabbage helped feed 275 people, her path became exceedingly clear — get kids to garden and grow vegetables because they can, and then have them donate the fresh produce to organizations working to alleviate community hunger. She did not know — to be fair she was nine, so she could not know — about all the exigencies surrounding hunger in the US and the disproportionate lack of fresh produce in anti-hunger efforts. But with more than 60 youth-run vegetable gardens in the country, from Hawaii to Maine, and more than 7,500 pounds of fresh food delivered, it’s safe to say she knows now.

Yash had a crummy start to high school and after a new pair of glasses, put his world back in view that could have been the end of it. But Yash amplified his experience, multiplied the effects over the course of an academic lifetime, was able to see the lost potential and created a pretty straightforward solution because as he rightly notes, “If every one of those three million pairs of glasses was collected instead of being discarded, every needy child without eyeglasses could have a pair in less than five years.” For just a minute, consider not being a grown-up and getting wrapped up in the logistics about prescriptions and shipping and all the reasons why it couldn’t be that easy, and just do the simple math… he’s right.

So, our task, challenge and collective reason for being here might not be to celebrate Katie and Yash — along with the other 2013 Hasbro Community Action Heroes, including Carter Jenkins (age 15), Stephanie Jennis (age 17), Zach Morgan (age 8) and Grace Anne Remey (age 9) — although certainly they deserve to be celebrated. It may just be to emulate them, take a page from their book, do as they have done and will, thankfully, continue to do. Summer is an excellent time to dip your toe into service with a small project — or jump all the way in to volunteerism as these young leaders have done.

Which really just leaves us with one question to answer: “America, what’s your forty-pound cabbage?”

 
 

When Katie Stagliano was nine years old she participated in the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Growing project. Established in 2002 to inspire kids to grow vegetables, the purpose of the program is as straigh…
When Katie Stagliano was nine years old she participated in the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Growing project. Established in 2002 to inspire kids to grow vegetables, the purpose of the program is as straigh…

 

What’s Your Forty-Pound Cabbage?

When Katie Stagliano was nine years old she participated in the Bonnie Plants Cabbage Growing project. Established in 2002 to inspire kids to grow vegetables, the purpose of the program is as straightforward as you’d think it ought to be. Grow cabbage. And, that’s exactly what she did; except this was no ordinary produce — Katie grew a forty pound cabbage. Most people, young or old, would probably take some pictures and maybe think “Coleslaw for everyone!” But not Katie. She saw this enormous piece of produce as both a challenge and an opportunity. In Katie’s own words:

At the age of nine, I did not have a true understanding of the complexities of the issue of hunger. What I did understand was that there were individuals and families in my community who did not have enough to eat. I have a backyard where I could and do grow fresh vegetables and donate the produce to families that are struggling with hunger — a simple solution to a problem that is not only in my community, but also globally.
And thus, Katie’s Krops was born.

Across the country young people just like Katie are seeing problems in their community and coming up with solutions to address them.

Yash Gupta’s high school career began in a most inauspicious way — his eyeglasses broke. As he stumbled through his first weeks of school without being able to see the board clearly and in general feeling more overwhelmed and disoriented than your typical freshman, one thing did become crystal clear for Yash — good vision might possibly be the most important and most overlooked component to a student’s academic success.

With a little digging, Yash learned that there are 13 million children in the world who need glasses but cannot afford them; he also found out that more than three million pairs of used eyeglasses are discarded in North America every year. So, Yash started Sight Learning to try to bridge the gap. For Yash, this isn’t merely about eyeglasses for 13 million kids; it is much, much more.

“These 13 million children are students, students who cannot make the most of their educational opportunities because of a lack of eyeglasses, which prevents them from being able to see and consequently learn,” Yash shared.

They are 13 million potential leaders, 13 million youth who can change the world in the future. Sight Learning’s work matters, not only because we are providing eye-glasses to students in developing nations, giving them better access to education and helping them for the future, but we are also inspiring youth around the world to take a stand, find a passion and make a difference.
Katie is 14 and Yash is 17. They are two of the six generationOn Hasbro Community Action Heroes selected this year — each remarkable in his or her own way. A Hasbro Community Action Hero is a young person who makes an extraordinary mark on the world through service. The winners’ achievements must demonstrate outstanding service to one’s local, national or global community, extraordinary effort in creating innovative solutions to community needs and leadership of an exceptional service or advocacy activity.

And, yes, it is true that Katie is the youngest person to ever receive the Clinton Global Citizen Award for Leadership in Civil Society, and it is also true that Yash’s organization has — thus far — raised more than $350,000 (7,000 pairs of eyeglasses and counting!) and conducted eye screenings in developing countries. They are, in a word, exceptional. What they are not, however, is “the exception” when it comes to youth service.

Both Katie and Yash embody the blessing of being young — sometimes things actually can be as straightforward as they appear, and young people really don’t like taking no for an answer. There is a lot we can learn from them. All Katie really did was grow an exceptionally large cabbage and then think to herself “there’s got to be something productive I can do with this produce.” When she donated it to a local food kitchen and learned that her one cabbage helped feed 275 people, her path became exceedingly clear — get kids to garden and grow vegetables because they can, and then have them donate the fresh produce to organizations working to alleviate community hunger. She did not know — to be fair she was nine, so she could not know — about all the exigencies surrounding hunger in the US and the disproportionate lack of fresh produce in anti-hunger efforts. But with more than 60 youth-run vegetable gardens in the country, from Hawaii to Maine, and more than 7,500 pounds of fresh food delivered, it’s safe to say she knows now.

Yash had a crummy start to high school and after a new pair of glasses, put his world back in view that could have been the end of it. But Yash amplified his experience, multiplied the effects over the course of an academic lifetime, was able to see the lost potential and created a pretty straightforward solution because as he rightly notes, “If every one of those three million pairs of glasses was collected instead of being discarded, every needy child without eyeglasses could have a pair in less than five years.” For just a minute, consider not being a grown-up and getting wrapped up in the logistics about prescriptions and shipping and all the reasons why it couldn’t be that easy, and just do the simple math… he’s right.

So, our task, challenge and collective reason for being here might not be to celebrate Katie and Yash — along with the other 2013 Hasbro Community Action Heroes, including Carter Jenkins (age 15), Stephanie Jennis (age 17), Zach Morgan (age 8) and Grace Anne Remey (age 9) — although certainly they deserve to be celebrated. It may just be to emulate them, take a page from their book, do as they have done and will, thankfully, continue to do. Summer is an excellent time to dip your toe into service with a small project — or jump all the way in to volunteerism as these young leaders have done.

Which really just leaves us with one question to answer: “America, what’s your forty-pound cabbage?”